Homemade Salt Water Taffy - Kitchen Science Experiment: the effect of temperature and torsion on a saccharide. candy making.

The Effect of Temperature and Torsion on the Structure of Saccharide

The Effect of Temperature and Torsion on the Structure of Saccharide

Meal type Dessert
Occasion Christmas, Summer
Homemade Salt Water Taffy - Kitchen Science Experiment: the effect of temperature and torsion on a saccharide. candy making.

Ingredients

  • 110ml sucrose (sugar)
  • 1ml NaCl (salt)
  • 74ml glucose (corn syrup)
  • 48ml H2O (water)
  • food coloring
  • flavoring (see note)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon margarine

Note

Suggestions for flavorings:

4-hydroxy-3methoxybenzaldehyde (vanilla)
3-ppmethanol (peppermint)
isoamyl acetate (banana)
methyl salicylate (wintergreen)
glycyrrhezec acid (licorice)
hesperidin (lemon)

makes about 15-20 one inch pieces.

Directions

Place the first four reagents in the large beaker. Thoroughly mix with stirring rod. Place over gentle to moderate flame until all the sucrose has dissolved, stirring constantly. Increase the heat and do not stir during the rest of the heating. The stirring rod may be used to keep crystals from forming on the sides of the beaker at the beginning of the experiment.
When the solution begins to boil, insert the thermometer (Don't let it touch the bottom of the beaker or you will get the temperature of the hot beaker rather than the solution). Heat until the thermometer registers 270 degrees F. While heating, prepare an aluminum foil pan and lubricate with hydrogenated vegetable oil. (The pan is made out of aluminum foil by bending up the edges about 1" all the way around.)

You will need 1 & 1/2 slices of margarine which you will be given already divided in 3 parts. One for the mixture after reaching 270 degrees F (next step), one piece of margarine for the pan, and one part for you & your lab partners hands, when you are ready to pull the taffy, NOT now.
As soon as the beaker reaches 270 degrees F, remove the heat, and add one slice of hydrogenated vegetable oil while stirring gently. The darkening of the mixture indicates the carbonization of some of the saccharide molecules and this color should not get dark brown, as it then begins to taste burnt.

Pour the mixture onto the aluminum foil pan using the big beaker tongs. When the beaker is empty place the beaker in the hot soapy water at your lab table along with the thermometer and stirring rod. (Start washing the beaker & other materials NOW as taffy is cooling).
When the mixture is cool enough to touch the top, take approximately 1 ml of your favorite flavoring* and 3 drops of your desired color* (you may wish to bring your favorite from home) and sprinkle them across the mixture. (Estimate the 1 ml- do not try to measure it.) Do not attempt to mix these last two reagents, as they will become mixed as you pull the mixture.
Each team member should now lubricate their hands with the remaining hydrogenated vegetable oil. When the mixture is cool enough to handle, begin to pull and fold, pull and fold. This allows the molecules to align
themselves and add air to the mixture.
When the mixture takes on a satin sheen, pull off bit-size pieces and wrap in saran wrap. Options may be to build a candy cane. Your imagination may provide an interesting option to this experiment. Consume the product.
Make sure your lab bench is just as you found it, thermometer and stir stick in the beaker, a new bag of sucrose and one piece of aluminum foil. All paper towels in the trash and the lab bench free of taffy, sugar, etc. Carefully dump the wash water into your lab sink. Place the green scrub pads on the lab top near the sink edge and take the pans to the back lab table.